Tag Archives: movies

Market Your Nonprofit like Movies

Yes, you read that right! Marketing your non-profit like movies are will take your fundraising to the next level. Movies make a ton of money every year across the globe. Hollywood alone makes net profit of over thirty billion dollars a year. Analyze how the last movie you saw was marketed to see if there are any ideas that will click with you. Your marketing initiative will, of course, depend on the size of your organization and your budget constraints but rest assured that this technique will bring you the ROI you’re looking for.

Besides the star power that boosts a movie’s success, marketing plays a huge role in putting the movie in the forefront of everyone’s mind. Below is a chronological step by step process of how movies are marketed and how you can be inspired by the techniques to market your non-profit organization.

1. Initial Teasers
For your non-profit organization, sending out a teaser in a newsletter and spreading it across your social media pages will create anticipation for what’s coming. The teaser can be text-based but if you want to go all out consider making a video teaser. Within this step, you can also publish a first-look type of image that features various aspects of the cause you’re supporting without any description.

2. Series of Trailers
Just like movies push out trailer one, two and so on, you can create a series of trailers for your marketing campaign that caters to varying demographics. This is your chance to entice people into supporting your fundraising campaign so give them all the reasons they should not only give donations but also inspire them to take it upon themselves to promote your campaign to their circles of influence.

3. Press Releases, Conferences & Interviews
This requires a lot of involvement from your team: your salesperson, public relations manager, social media coordinator but most importantly the individual that is the face of your marketing campaign. For the United Nations, stars like Angelina Jolie are selected to be brand ambassadors so that they can embody the values of the organization as well as promote the features of your product or service.

4. Commercials, billboards and social media ads
All three of the above mediums can display video ads which happens to be the most effective to grab people’s attention. Commercials are slightly different from trailers because they are usually more compact.

5. Movie premier
Movie premiers are big events with a lot of media hype, great food and an after party. Hollywood stars dress up in their most lavish outfits and have fun while celebrating the work they have completed. If you can have a great gathering for the launch of the cause you’re endorsing and invite the who’s who of your industry.

6. Post release marketing
This is a great time to gauge how the campaign was received by your audiences so put your team to work to create surveys, make phone calls and set up interviews with your supporters as well as the prospects that didn’t end up committing to your cause. Find out the hits, misses and the opportunities so you can take the lessons learned to your next campaign.

The 25 Greatest Sports Movies of All Time

“With the seventh Rocky movie, Creed, coming out later this month and My All American, an inspirational sports film about a former Texas football player, hitting theaters Friday, we at FTW decided to rank the top 25 sports movies ever made. The master list from which to choose is smaller than you think: Since 1976, Box Office Mojo lists the release of just 204 sports movies. By comparison, 604 films have dropped in 2015 with dozens of more slated before the end of the year. It’s not a genre that’s particularly popular: Just 12 sports movies had made more than $100 million at the box office and those were mostly cheesy comedies or feel-good stories peripherally about sports (The Blind Side). Our only rule: No documentaries. There are too many great ones out there (not Hoop Dreams — that’s the most overrated sports film ever) and they’re far too different from a comedy or drama to compare. (That list will come at another time.)

25. THE KARATE KID

The final movie on our list was tough to choose — it was one tale of a diminutive outsider fighting for respect against another, but we had to go with Daniel LaRusso; sorry Rudy. Though the music is great and the last scene is pretty good, the cloying Notre Dame love is a little much and Rudy’s a bit whiny, no? I mean, leave Dan Devine alone. He has a team to coach! But Karate Kid? It’s just Daniel-San, Mr. Miyagi and Elisabeth Shue battling the world. Well, them and Joe Esposito.”

Read the full post here.

Top 10 Classic Sport Movies

Fighting, dying, hoping, hating … great sports films are about far more than sport itself. Here Guardian and Observer critics pick their 10 best.10.

This Sporting Life
Lindsay Anderson brought to bear on his adaptation of David Storey’s first novel, all the poetic-realist instincts he had been honing for the previous decade as a documentarian in the Humphrey Jennings mould. (Anderson had won the 1953 best doc Oscar for Thursday’s Children.) Filmed partly in Halifax and Leeds, but mainly in and around Wakefield Trinity Rugby League Club, one of its incidental attractions is its record of a northern, working-class sports culture that would change out of all recognition over the next couple of decades.

The story of Frank Machin, a miner who becomes a star on the rugby field, all the while knowing that he is considered as disposable property – a machin(e)? – by his club, and as “a great ape on a football field” by his landlady and lover (Rachel Roberts), is told in a stream-of-consciousness style, largely in flashbacks from a dentist’s chair, using some of the most inventive editing – by Peter Taylor – that British cinema had ever seen. Produced by Karel Reisz, it was perhaps the last gasp of the northern kitchen-sink boomlet inaugurated by Room at the Top and climaxing with Reisz’s Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, and its failure at the box-office caused producers to withdraw from the genre.

Nonetheless, this is the movement’s artistic pinnacle, featuring marvellous black and white cinematography by Denys Coop, and performances that are still shattering to witness. Harris was just back from Tahiti, having played opposite Marlon Brando in Mutiny on the Bounty, and although he abhorred Brando, the cursed and luckless Machin – shirt number 13 – is as Brando-esque a performance as British cinema has ever produced.

And though the rugby scenes take up relatively little screen-time, they are vivid, violent and frenetic, with massed crowds of working men roaring on the touchline. The last match, with Harris physically exhausted and emotionally destroyed, and black with mud, is filmed like a day on the Somme.”

Read the full post here.